9 American habits I gave up when I moved to Europe

Driving

creative commons /epSos .de

creative commons /epSos .de

Now I live in a walkable city with great public transport and bike-paths.

Wearing shoes in the house

creative commons / Sarah Joy

creative commons / Sarah Joy

It still takes me a few days to adjust after I visit the states but the house stays cleaner.

Talking to strangers

creative commons / Christopher Michel

creative commons / Christopher Michel

Small talk with the clerk at the shop is no more than a “Hi” and a “Thanks”. Oh and forget about talking with someone sitting next to you on the bus. That is certifiable.

Caring about name brand foods

creative commmons / Mikey

creative commmons / Mikey

Since I am not from here, all of the name brands of foods are changed so I might as well go to the cheapest shop or get the cheapest brands if the quality is about the same.

 Using air conditioning

creative commons / CWCS Managed Hosting

creative commons / CWCS Managed Hosting

There just isn’t any, at least not in Northern Europe. If it gets hot you just open a window.

 

Tipping

creative commons / Aberro Creative

creative commons / Aberro Creative

Not necessary since the wages of waiting staff is not jokingly low like it is in the states and the service is never that great anyway since the servers are not trying to earn a tip.

Shopping late

creative commons / Edward Webb

creative commons / Edward Webb

Just about everything closes when office hours close. There are very very few all-night shops.




 Watching TV

creative commons / schmilblick

creative commons / schmilblick

Tv in other languages just doesn’t interest me even when I understand the language. Now I can watch all of the shows I want over the internet.

 

 

Tumble drying my clothes

creative commons / Monica Arellano-Ongpin

creative commons / Monica Arellano-Ongpin

Clothes last longer and fit better when they are hung dry in a drying cabinet. I only tumble dry my towels so they are snuggly soft.